Categories
Hardware

Global Augmented and Mixed Reality Market (2021 to 2026)


Dublin, March 03, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The “Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Technology, Infrastructure, Devices, Solutions, Apps and Services in Industry Verticals 2021 – 2026” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

This report assesses AR, MR, and other immersive technology components, the AR/MR ecosystem, and competitive landscape. The report evaluates market opportunities for hardware, software, and services. The analysis takes into consideration market drivers and constraints such as potential regulatory developments and associated implications.

The report provides detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis including forecasts for AR/MR by major hardware components, software, services, semiconductor components, and more for 2021 to 2026.

Select Report Findings:

  • Hardware is the largest market segment with HUD the largest component
  • The overall market is anticipated to grow at a CAGR of 54.0% and reach $372 billion
  • Consumer electronics is the largest industry vertical whereas the military segment is expected to have the highest growth potential
  • Latin America is expected to have the highest growth with a CAGR of 77.0%. Brazil and Argentina are the major countries within the region
  • China, India, and Japan are leading countries in Asia Pac while South Africa, UAE, and South Africa are the major countries in the MEA region
  • North America is the largest region, followed by Europe. USA is the largest country in North America, while Germany, France, UK are in Europe

The report also provides specific insights and recommendations for major ecosystem constituents including Advertisers and Media Companies, Artificial Intelligence Providers, Automotive Companies, Broadband Infrastructure Providers, Communication Service Providers, Computing Companies, Data Analytics Providers, Equipment Providers, IoT Suppliers and Service Providers, Semiconductor Companies, Smart City Systems Integrators, Social Media Companies, and Software Developers.

Assisted or Augmented Reality (AR) represents a live (direct or indirect), view of a physical, real-world environment in which certain elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input. In addition to a visual overlay, AR may also provide audio and tactile inputs to the user, and rely upon presence and positioning technologies to present location-specific sensory inputs and information to the user. In this manner, AR represents a blending of information technology and media within a real-world environment for the benefit of consumers, businesses, and industrial users.

Mixed Reality (MR) represents a form of hybrid reality in which physical and digital objects co-exist and interact in real-time. With MR, either virtual objects are digitally mixed into reality or real-world objects are merged into virtual worlds. The latter case is sometimes referred to as “Augmented Virtuality”, and is one step closer to a more evolved Virtual Reality (VR), as real-world objects in a virtual world take on a sense of permanency with real objects, appearing to actually exist within the virtual world.

Adding to this sense of permanency, real-world objects in a virtual world may be digitally controlled. Conversely, MR may also support the manipulation of virtual objects permanently placed in the real-world. In either scenario, MR will be an important aspect of telerobotics and other forms of teleoperation.

The primary goal of AR is to enrich the user’s perception of the real-world, providing information and insights that otherwise would not be obtainable. AR use cases have grown substantially across many industry verticals within the last two years, providing significant market momentum, and indicating great promise to transform communications, content, and commerce across a wide range of sectors. The goals of MR are broad, yet directionally focused on a true merging of real and virtual worlds, which we believe will be a major catalyst for wide-spread acceptance and usage of VR across all major industry sectors.

AR and MR Market Developments

The growing demand of AR in the entertainment, retail, and defense sectors is encouraging manufacturers to expand their business. Both traditional advertisers and digital media companies need to get ready for increased altered reality. Advertisers are looking at using augmented reality as part of a marketing drive in order to attract new customers as well as retentive existing ones.

Apple is planning to launch its first augmented reality headset in 2022. It will follow that with a smaller pair of AR glasses in 2023. The AR smart glasses market is picking up pace as it inches away from being a niche product to becoming an industrial and enterprise problem solver. Mass consumer adoption is elusive, if not years away, but the market is building its ecosystem, refining hardware, and taking a more realistic approach for the long-run ramp-up of smart AR glasses.

AR and MR Market Outlook

The total global augmented and mixed reality market is expected to reach $103.9 billion growing at 79.2% CAGR. Hardware is the major component in the total global augmented and mixed reality market. The software segment is expected to reach $32 billion with a CAGR of 89.2%. Hardware components in training and education are anticipated to propel the market growth in the forecast period. The service segment is expected to reach $6.7 billion with a CAGR of 105.8%.

Report Benefits:

  • Augmented and Mixed reality forecasts through 2026
  • Identify market leaders and their strategies and solutions
  • Understand the market dynamics within the AR/MR ecosystem
  • Understand the relationship between AR/MR and other technologies
  • Identify high-potential investment areas for AR/MR application development

Key Topics Covered:

1.0 Executive Summary

2.0 Introduction
2.1 Augmented Reality and Mixed Reality
2.2 Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality and Merged Reality
2.3 Augmented Reality Value Chain
2.4 Market Drivers
2.4.1 Increasing Demand of AR Devices in Healthcare
2.4.2 Growing Demand of AR Devices in Retail & E-Commerce
2.4.3 Increasing Application of AR in the Gaming Industry
2.5 Challenges
2.5.1 High Set-up Cost
2.5.2 Reconfiguration of Applications for Various Platforms
2.5.3 Limited Content

3.0 Augmented Reality Ecosystem
3.1 AR Hardware vs. Software
3.2 Mobile AR vs. Dedicated Hardware
3.3 Marker Based Reality vs. Marker Less Reality
3.4 Mixed Reality and Reconfigurable Workforce
3.5 AR Application Landscape
3.5.1 Consumer Electronics
3.5.2 Industrial
3.5.3 Enterprise
3.5.4 Military and Defense
3.6 Regulatory Landscape
3.6.1 Digital Millennium Copyright Act
3.6.2 Communication Decency Act
3.6.3 Federal Trade Commission
3.7 Competitive Landscape

4.0 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market Drivers and Opportunities
4.1 Consumer Awareness and Acceptance
4.2 Compelling Applications
4.3 Business-to-Business Apps and Services
4.4 Teleoperation and Tele-robotics

5.0 Company Analysis
5.1 Google Inc.
5.2 DAQRI
5.3 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.
5.4 Seiko Epson Corp.
5.5 Sony Corporation
5.6 Qualcomm Inc.
5.7 Microsoft Corporation
5.8 PTC Corporation
5.9 Apple Inc.
5.10 HTC Corporation
5.11 Niantic Inc.
5.12 EON Reality Inc.
5.13 Magic Leap
5.14 Intel Corporation
5.15 Facebook Corporation
5.16 Wikitude GmbH
5.17 Zugara Inc.
5.18 Blippar
5.19 Upskill
5.20 Infinity Augmented Reality Inc.
5.21 Atheer Inc.
5.22 Marxent Labs LLC
5.23 Inglobe Technologies
5.24 ScopeAR
5.25 Catchoom Technologies
5.26 Ubimax GmbH
5.27 ABB

6.0 Market Analysis and Forecast
6.1 Global Augmented and Mixed Reality Market 2021 – 2026
6.1.1 Total Market Size 2021 – 2026
6.1.2 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Segment
6.1.3 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware Type
6.1.4 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by AR Device Type
6.1.5 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware Component Type
6.1.6 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Sensors Type
6.1.7 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Semiconductor Component Type
6.1.8 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Software Segment
6.1.8.1 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Software Functions
6.1.8.2 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Software Type
6.1.8.3 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Service Type
6.1.8.3.1 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Professional Service Type
6.1.9 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Type
6.1.9.1 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Marker Based Reality Type
6.1.9.2 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Markerless Reality Type
6.1.10 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Technology
6.1.11 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Industry Vertical
6.1.11.1 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Consumer Electronics Application
6.1.11.2 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Entertainment Application
6.1.11.3 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Enterprise Application
6.1.11.4 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Retail and E-Commerce Application
6.1.11.5 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Healthcare and Medical Application
6.1.11.6 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Industrial Application
6.1.11.7 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Military and Defense Application
6.2 Regional Market Forecast 2021 – 2026
6.2.1 Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Region
6.2.2 North America Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware, Software, Service, Market Type, Technology, Industry Vertical, and Country
6.2.3 Europe Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware, Software, Service, Market Type, Technology, Industry Vertical, and Country
6.2.4 APAC Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware, Software, Service, Market Type, Technology, Industry Vertical, and Country
6.2.5 MEA Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware, Software, Service, Market Type, Technology, Industry Vertical, and Country
6.2.6 Latin America Augmented and Mixed Reality Market by Hardware, Software, Service, Market Type, Technology, Industry Vertical, and Country
6.3 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Forecast 2021 – 2026
6.3.1 Global Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units
6.3.2 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Device Type
6.3.3 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Industry Vertical
6.3.3.1 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Consumer Electronics Application
6.3.3.2 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Entertainment Application
6.3.3.3 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Enterprise Application
6.3.3.4 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Retail and E-Commerce Application
6.3.3.5 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Healthcare and Medical Application
6.3.3.6 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Industrial Application
6.3.3.7 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Military and Defense Application
6.3.4 Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Region
6.3.4.1 North America Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Country
6.3.4.2 Europe Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Country
6.3.4.3 APAC Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Country
6.3.4.4 MEA Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Country
6.3.4.5 MEA Augmented Reality Device Shipment Units by Country

7.0 Conclusions and Recommendations
7.1.1 Advertisers and Media Companies
7.1.2 Artificial Intelligence Providers
7.1.3 Automotive Companies
7.1.4 Broadband Infrastructure Providers
7.1.5 Communication Service Providers
7.1.6 Computing Companies
7.1.7 Data Analytics Providers
7.1.8 Equipment Providers
7.1.9 IoT Suppliers and Service Providers
7.1.10 Semiconductor Companies
7.1.11 Smart City Systems Integrators
7.1.12 Social Media Companies
7.1.13 Software Developers

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/ogthi7

CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com
Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager
[email protected]
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Categories
Future

The future of work in 2021: Perspectives from South Africa


This article is part of the series — Africa in 2021.


The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the livelihoods of many South Africans and as has happened time and time again in times of economic strain, the poor and unskilled suffer the most. The number of unemployed South Africans rose by 2.2 million to 6.5 million people altogether, between the second and third quarters of 2020. With the economy slipping deeper into recession, 2021 will be another difficult year. How must the world of work change to raise productivity and keep people economically active? For the unemployed, is there a future of work, without work?

To adequately address this matter, it is important to start by framing the future of work as a dynamic that goes beyond the automation of simple tasks and remote working. At a fundamental level, the future of work is about how societies optimally leverage their human capital to do the work of delivering goods and services that create value. This involves determining the tasks to be done of wide-ranging complexity, matching human capability to the tasks that require human capability, matching when the task is done with available capacity, and deciding how and where the tasks get done. The future of work will spur significant innovation to support the range of end-to-end activities required.

The primary trends I expect to see in 2021 as South Africa seeks to adapt and cope are:

• Re-organisation of how we work to fully maximise the benefits of cloud-based productivity and collaboration tools.

• Uberisation of more services expanding the reach of the gig economy.

• Large-scale use of just-in-time, just-in-context, bite-sized learning on the go.

• Greater adoption of virtual reality and augmented reality for experiential and practical training for artisans and professionals and real-time performance support.

While South African professionals have had access to the latest cloud collaboration and productivity tools for communications, workflow management, knowledge sharing and the like for decades already; it is only in 2020, the year of COVID-19, that we saw a dramatic adoption of such Software as a Service (SaaS) tools even by technophobes. Zoom jumped from 148th position to become the most popular app within a few days at the onset of lockdown regulations. Now that these tools are embedded, professionals should, in 2021, grow from novice usage, to more integrated, productivity-enhancing usage patterns that are non-negotiable to transform into data-driven organisations. 2021 is the best year to hope that documents will no longer reside on individual’s devices; that calculations will no longer be done manually on spreadsheets; and that email will cease to be used as a disastrous combination of internal and external communication, project and progress tracking, document sharing, information storage and appointment setting, amongst others. COVID-19 has finally proven that most workers in the services sector really don’t need to drive to a building every single day to work, which should certainly speed up this re-organisation.

With formal sector employment trends indicating a downward shift across the spectrum from highly skilled to semi-skilled workers, the gig economy will start to seem like the standard way of work. It was estimated that, before the impact of COVID-19, the gig economy directly touched one percent of the South African population and indirectly half a million people, with expectations of 10 percent growth a year. In the semi-skilled market, SweepSouth has proven the case for the uberisation of domestic services, having celebrated 1 million bookings and work opportunities provided to domestic workers in South Africa. SweepSouth pushes aside outdated views that the digital economy is inaccessible to the marginalised communities, as they have been able to provide dignified work at decent pay to many South African women. While there are, no doubt, concerns about worker’s rights and work conditions for gig-workers — who often work without adequate health insurance or leave options — this trend will expand into other industries, from more home services, to retail stores and customer service agents for example. The gig economy is key to keeping more people economically active as cost pressures increase. This trend will directly address the aspects of the future of work related to the matching of tasks to human capability and availability. McKinsey estimates that 63 million African people across the continent are self-employed.

South Africa’s greatest challenge by far and away is the skills gap that negatively impacts our ability to match tasks to human capability. The country only produces 77,000 high school graduates that pass higher grade mathematics a year and over 90 percent of unemployed people are semi-skilled or low-skilled, showing the strong link between skills and employment. Instead of seeing the fourth industrial revolution as a threat, it will be crucial here to use digital technologies to close the skills gap. Changes in technology, ways of work, business models and industry regulations have, from our experience at Rekindle Learning, generated a tremendous demand for continuous learning and development. Yet many organisations are still sending out emails with long memos hoping people will read them. Or herding people into one room or webinar for workshops and hoping they listen. Or forcing people to flick through dozens of slides with a quick quiz at the end and hoping something sticks. Tick-box training has no place in the future world of work — there is only space for high-impact digital learning experiences that deliver measurable business results. Employee experience and micro-learning platforms in the form of short videos, contextual interactive content, chats and personalised messaging, rapid two-way surveys and feedback, and real-time reporting are an essential part of enabling continuous learning integrated with work.

The upskilling conversation also has to expand beyond the knowledge-transfer mode of learning, and tackle experiential learning using mixed-reality technologies that can more effectively train for complex tasks and/or train people with weak educational backgrounds for whom, an academic approach to learning is onerous. Jendamark is one of the pioneers in manufacturing using augmented reality glasses to provide real-time performance support to machine operators through which they can view instructions and guidance as they work. Their virtual reality training means their operators are able to reach peak performance in a much shorter space of time.

Harvard Business Review has framed the impact of COVID-19 as the ‘most significant social experiment of the future of work in action, with work from home and social distancing policies radically changing the way we work and interact.’ The experiment continues into 2021, and thanks to local technology players in the future world of work, South Africa is able to drive its own version to meet contextual demands. One thing is for sure, the future of work is digital.





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Categories
Hardware

Facebook’s big bet on hardware is starting to pay off


Year-end sales numbers are telling Facebook executives that their big bet on hardware is starting to pay off.

Driving the news: Facebook’s hardware team found itself just where it hoped to be for the holiday shopping season: under the Christmas tree, with both Quest 2 VR systems and Portal smart screens delivering better-than-expected sales.

Why it matters: Hardware isn’t where Facebook makes its money, but homegrown devices are key to its strategic future.

  • When Facebook builds a device, it has much more control over the experience, and the business, than when it creates software to run on other companies’ devices — particularly those made by Apple, with whom the company is increasingly at odds.

Facebook hardware chief Andrew Bosworth, a longtime executive known for frank assessments of Facebook’s wins and missteps, told Axios he was encouraged that it took just seven weeks in the market for the Oculus Quest 2 to surpass the original Quest in terms of active monthly users.

  • “The curve has a really nice shape to it,” said Bosworth, who cites the data in a post going live today.
  • Observers also noted that the Oculus app was near the top of the iOS download charts just after Christmas. (A spike in app downloads is often a good indicator of how many people just got new hardware for the holidays.)

“Christmas Day unboxing was a fun day for us,” Bosworth said.

  • Facebook also built enough of the new Oculus to avoid the shortages that plagued the first Oculus Quest through much of 2020.

The big picture: Bosworth isn’t sharing hard sales numbers. He said they’re less important to Facebook right now than ensuring developers can finally make money building apps for VR.

  • “For a long time, VR has been a leap of faith for developers,” he said. “We now have lots of successful profitable VR developers.”

Bosworth recalled a comment Bill Gates made while visiting Facebook: In order for a platform to be a success, according to Gates, the companies who build on top of your product have to make more money than you do from selling it.

Of note: The VR category is finally breaking past the hardcore gamer set, which tends to be dominated by men.

  • “The number of women in VR is growing. It’s bigger than people realize,” Bosworth said.

That makes a difference for Facebook’s long-term ambition to turn virtual-reality environments into places for social interaction.

  • Too many dudes, and the experience seems more like an episode of “Silicon Valley” than a night at a hip club or bar.

Facebook’s Portal “had a huge Christmas too,” Bosworth said.

  • The smart display line has added support for Zoom, WebEx and other work video conferencing apps in recent months.
  • Bosworth said most Facebook employees have the devices, which helps the company provide good support for new apps.
  • One factor behind Portal growth, he adds, is that consumers buy them in multiples — so, for example, a grandparent can easily communicate with a grandchild.

What’s next: One of Facebook’s big product debuts this year will be smart glasses it’s making in partnership with Ray-Ban’s parent company.



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