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Future

Charleston County School District looking to invest in future teachers


CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) – The Charleston County School District is looking at ways to expand its teacher residency programs and invest in future teachers.

District leaders say there is no one way to get into a teaching career, and the traditional approach does not work for everyone. That is why they have the residency program which allows aspiring teachers to get experience in the classroom.

This year, there are five residents from the College of Charleston that are working with experienced teachers at Memminger Elementary School.

“At Memminger, our residency program is designed to have folks who are not quite ready for the full responsibility for a classroom to be in a classroom with an experienced teacher, and it allows us to give more individualized attention to kids,” CCSD Chief Academic Officer Karolyn Belcher said. “It also allows that aspiring teacher to get more support in terms of their readiness to lead their own classroom the following year.”

The district has a different approach for people who are interested in teaching but may not have majored in education.

In partnership with the University of South Carolina, 16 people are currently working as ‘teachers of record’ at C.E. Williams Middle School. They teach alone in the classroom, while taking courses at night and on the weekends to receive their master’s degree.

Belcher says the district hopes to use some of the COVID-19 federal funds that will be given to them, to expand these programs and try other models at different schools.

“The state is reviewing application and initial proposal for ESSER 2. As many in the community know, we’re in the process of community engagement to really hear from people about what they think will be critical. We anticipate that a big investment will be in capacity building of our talent,” Belcher said. ” In general, investing in our people is a good way to position ourselves for the future, so that I think it’s going to a key lever and the residency idea is one of those levers we expect to pull.”

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.



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Gadgets

Samsung Electronics Q2 profit likely up 38% on strong chip prices


People wears masks in front of a Samsung store at a main shopping area as the country is hit by an outbreak of the new coronavirus in downtown Shanghai, China February 21, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

  • Q2 operating profit estimated at 11.3 trln won
  • Surging chip prices, shipments boost profit
  • Revenue estimated up 15.4%
  • Smartphones shipments likely fell on quarter

SEOUL, July 6 (Reuters) – Samsung Electronics Co Ltd (005930.KS) likely saw a 38% surge in profit for the April-June quarter thanks to strong chip prices and demand spurred by a pandemic-led consumer appetite for electronics as well as recovering investment in data centres.

Operating profit for the world’s biggest memory chip and smartphone maker likely jumped to 11.3 trillion won ($10 billion), according to a Refinitiv SmartEstimate drawn from 20 analysts and weighted toward those who are more consistently accurate.

The South Korean tech giant’s strong performance – coming despite it shipping fewer smartphones than in January-March – underscores the stratospheric demand for chips that has depleted stockpiles and filled production capacity.

The result would be up 20% from the first quarter and mark Samsung’s highest operating income for the second quarter since 2018. Revenue likely rose 15.4%.

Samsung is scheduled to announce preliminary second-quarter results on Wednesday.

The company’s chip division likely benefited from memory chip price hikes that exceeded market estimates, analysts said, while shipments grew as well.

Prices of DRAM chips, widely used in servers, mobile phones and other computing devices, jumped 27% compared to the March quarter, while those of NAND flash chips that serve the data storage market rose 8.6%, according to research provider Trendforce.

Profit also improved at Samsung’s chip-contract manufacturing and logic chip design business, partly because operations at its storm-hit Texas factory returned to normal, analysts said.

They estimated the chip division’s operating profit in April-June rose about 22% from the year-earlier period to about 6.6 trillion won.

Still, Samsung’s smartphone shipments dropped to about 59 million in April-June from about 76 million in the first quarter, according to Shinyoung Investment & Securities, as sales slowed for its latest flagship model, launched in mid-January.

Reduced demand from India, hard hit by the pandemic during the quarter, as well as tight supply for some mobile processor chips may also have affected shipments, analysts said, estimating the mobile business’ operating profit at about 2.9 trillion won.

($1 = 1,129.2800 won)

Reporting by Joyce Lee; Additional reporting by Heekyong Yang; Editing by Sayantani Ghosh and Christopher Cushing

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.



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Future

India’s opposition sees hope for the future in Modi’s state election defeat


Supporters of Chief Minister of West Bengal state and the Chief of Trinamool Congress (TMC) Mamata Banerjee celebrate after the initial poll results, amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Kolkata, India, May 2, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri

Indian opposition parties and political commentators cheered the election victory of a regional leader over Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ruling party in a big battleground state as a sign his populist sway could be checked.

Sunday’s defeat came as Modi is being slammed publicly for failing to tackle India’s explosive spike in coronavirus infections that has left the country in deep crisis, with hospital and crematoriums swamped and people dying for lack of oxygen.

Modi addressed dozens of political rallies in the state of West Bengal hoping to widen the appeal of his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to the east of the country from its traditional northern and western strongholds.

But West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, who ran the campaign for her regional party from a wheelchair because of a fall at a rally, won a two-thirds victory, raising opposition hopes Modi could be challenged across the country.

“What Bengal does today, India does tomorrow,” columnist Shobhaa De wrote in The Print, paraphrasing a quotation by 19th century liberal Gopal Krishna Gokhale.

“What happened in West Bengal is just the beginning.”

Prashant Kishor, a political strategist for Banerjee, said: “The election result has given voice and hope to those who want to fight this danger called BJP.”

The Shiv Sena, another regional group that controls the western state of Maharashtra that includes Mumbai, said that the election result was a personal defeat for Modi because he put everything on the line and ignored the health crisis.

“Instead of tackling the raging COVID-19 pandemic, the entire central government, including Prime Minister Narendra Modi, was in the poll arena of West Bengal to defeat (Chief Minister) Mamata Banerjee,” it said.

IRON GRIP

Modi has held an iron grip on Indian politics since sweeping to power in 2014 and winning a bigger victory in the 2019 national election on the back of a strong Hindu ideology.

Until now there has been no challenger and with the main opposition Congress party unable to get its act together, Modi has been expected to win the 2024 national poll.

But images of people dying from COVID-19 in hospital parking lots and corridors because of lack of beds, hospitals themselves begging for life saving oxygen supplies and overflowing crematoriums have shaken the public mood, opinion polls show.

Confidence in the government’s handling of the crisis has plummeted since February when the second wave of infections started, according to a survey among urban Indians by polling agency YouGov.

From 89% saying the government has handled the Covid issue ‘very’ or ‘somewhat’ well in April 2020, this number has declined to 59% at the end of April 2021, the latest data from YouGov’s Covid-19 Public Monitor showed.

Covid is fanning a growing anger against the federal government, said political commentator Neerja Chowdhury.

“People are not likely to forget the shortage of hospital beds, oxygen and vaccines in a hurry. They are also unlikely to forget in a hurry that the BJP’s central leadership made winning Bengal its life and death battle, when there is a real life and death struggle on in the country.”

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.



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